About Author

Nathalie M.L. Römer

Nathalie M.L. Römer
BIOGRAPHY

Nathalie M.L. Römer is an author based in Gusselby, Sweden. She lives here with her partner Anders. Before this, she lived for over two decades in Britain. She was born and initially raised in the Netherlands.

Nathalie considers herself a multi-genre author and independently publishes under her imprint Emerentsia Publications. She primarily writes epic fantasy, futuristic science fiction, mysteries and romance.

Nathalie M.L. Römer's Books

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Book
(2) $4.99 kindleeBook, Paperback,
Tainted Truth (The Wolf Riders of Keldarra Book 1)by Nathalie M.L. RömerPublish: Mar 19, 2019Series: The Wolf Riders of KeldarraFantasy
Chase The Dream
(1) $0.99 kindleeBook,
Chase The Dreamby Nathalie M.L. RömerPublish: Nov 09, 2019Contemporary Romance
Donta Naughty
(1) kindleeBook,
Donta Naughtyby Nathalie M.L. RömerPublish: Jun 30, 2020Historical Romance Erotic Romance
Stolen Truth (The Wolf Riders of Keldarra Book 2)
(1) $4.99 kindleeBook,
Stolen Truth (The Wolf Riders of Keldarra Book 2)by Nathalie M.L. RömerPublish: Dec 01, 2020Series: The Wolf Riders of KeldarraFantasy
Hidden
(2) $2.99 kindleeBook,
Hiddenby Nathalie M.L. RömerPublish: Nov 22, 2018Women's Fiction

Nathalie M.L. Römer's Series in Order

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  • The Wolf Riders of Keldarra

    Stolen Truth (The Wolf Riders of Keldarra Book 2) - Published on Dec, 2020 Tainted Truth (The Wolf Riders of Keldarra Book 1) - Published on Mar, 2019

Nathalie M.L. Römer interview On 30, Jun 2020

"Nathalie M.L. Römer has always enjoyed reading books of different genres. She has been an author since November 2014. She chose to be a multi-genre author as the most captivating books borrow from all genres. The author writes epic fantasy and romance to captivate her readers by providing an entertaining read."
Were you born in Gusselby, Sweden? Since how long have you been living here?

I moved to Gusselby, where I live and work as an author a few years ago, after moving to Sweden in 2015. I've been an author since November 2014, and I credit the unhurried atmosphere of where I live for my writing efforts to date. Before I moved to Sweden I lived in Britain for 25 years.

Where did you meet your partner Anders?

Anders, who is native to Sweden, and I actually met by chance while we both played the game World of Warcraft. I'm writing a book (with his blessing) about how and why we met, so I can't go into much details (as Dr Rive Song from Dr Who says: "Spoilers.")

Did you choose to be a multi-genre author or did it happen with time?

I've always enjoyed reading books of different genres, The three types were and are fantasy, science fiction and mystery. I chose to be a multi-genre author as the most captivating books borrow from all genres. There is fantasy, mystery, adventure, romance, and even a trail of a whodunnit weaving through my fantasy series The Wolf Riders of Keldarra. I just pick genres and thropes that fit in a story, and as I'm a discovery writer (pantser) for the most part I find myself borrowing from everything I've ever seen used in storytelling no matter the original medium. If I know I can deliver a story of a genre or a trope I'll begin the work on it, and then, eventually, I'll have another book for readers to enjoy.

When did you decide to become a published author?

I don't think I can go into much detail of why for legal reasons, but I was aware of what is called "vanity publishing" (mostly as I worked in a bookstore once, long ago, as a temp job. The manager there taught me the earliest stuff about book publishing, though not much. The idea of writing books stems back from childhood, when a teacher told me I'd either be an artist or a writer. I was an artist for a few decades, mostly doing freelance advert design, but then I decided during Summer of 2014 to explore the idea of book writing. I was frequenting a forum of some sort at the time, and posted there I was going to work on a short story. This led to "a vanity publisher" (withholding the name for aforementioned reasons) somehow found out my home phone number (unlisted). They pestered me relentlessly. I saw in an article by SFWA an article about how they played a prank on a vanity publisher. So I decided to do the same. The "oh's" and "ah's" from the woman who called me when I read out the first lines from 20-30 books, with her thinking I was reading my manuscript... I kept my manuscript, which would later become part of Tainted Truth as far as I could from her (it's a later chapter in the book). From a good laugh over a successful prank I went to sitting on my bed and writing longform. By the evening I had 1,400 words written, a crude outline and a desire to finish the idea and publish it.

I succeeded in my goal, though it came with bumps in the road, and a process that taught me 90% of what I know now about writing, editing, publishing and much more, though I keep on learning more every day. But that I've grown as an author shows from a graph I screen grabbed from the app Fictionary, showing how closely I write to the typical story arc as shown in the image shared on my official Facebook page (see https://www.facebook.com/nathaliemlromer/photos/a.1688888438039570/2552438275017911/?type=1&theater)

Being a multi-genre author, which genre do you enjoy writing in the most?

I'm definitely finding my strength in the fantasy genre. I guess I've been influenced both by being a Lord of the Rings fan and also being aware of the backstory for the game World of Warcraft, which both demonstrated you can think big when it comes to creating a new world. But it hasn't stopped me from exporting the same methodology I use for creating a fantasy world to creating a bit of Earth that doesn't really exist. When I heard a comment that Midsomer Murders takes place in a village that doesn't exist I decided it gave me creative freedom to spin fantasy elements in our worlds of places of things that don't exist. The village in another book I wrote, which is due for re-release in 2022 (The Mystery of Priory Mansion) is set in a village that equally only exists in my book and not in the real world. Fantasy will always be the genre I enjoy the most (stares at the long list of projects in my notebook!) but I love to explore other genres. As I said earlier, it's more the question "Can I write something in this setting?" that drives me forward in my writing efforts than a favoritism of a genre.

What are the challenges of publishing independently?

The biggest one is that you do everything. But you can make it easier by planning everything. Everyone is aware of plotting a book. Plot the writing career as diligently as well. Yeah, yeah, I said I'm a pantser, but I do think it's important to have some notes and some ideas written for a book. Similarly, you need to understand what you do when you become an independent author, publisher, entrepreneur. You run a business. Your books are the products you create. You need to make certain you want to create the product you're selling. And when the book is done you put in effort to keep getting more and more interest in it. Not everyone has the big budget for marketing, so even if you're the "shoestring" person, still do as much as you can to publicise yourself. The biggest key factor of discoverability is that your book's metadata (title, author name, blurb, ISBN, etc.) is accurate and as much "filled in" as you can get it. In the end it takes just one person to think "this is an awesome book and all my friends need to buy it too" and so the person tells friends, and they do it too in turn, and you could end up selling many books suddenly. But book publishing is a long haul effort. It can take a decade for most authors to be "well known" and you need several books to improve your discoverability. Alone doesn't mean you're isolated. The others in the industry who also publish, sell, market, etc. are your greatest allies. I found my personal ally and friend in Orna Ross who taught me the number one thing that stopped me from giving up: "The more you write the better you get at it..."

In which year did you start your imprint Emerentsia Publications?

The imprint was launched in 2015 as soon as I began working on my first book. The name of the imprint is derived from the first name of my partner's grandmother, who was known as Emerentsia. She was a potter in Lindesberg, which is where my partner grew up. The imprint is part of the parent company Emerentsia Group which we're planning to incorporate as a partnership in 2021.

How did you begin writing The Wolf Riders of Keldarra series?

From the start I knew it was going to be a series. As I plotted the story arc for the series, the series went from three books to five books, then to seven, and after I found further plot holes in 2017 I settled on a nine-book series. I'm currently rewriting Book 2 and 3 for re-release (they were previously published), and I'm finalizing the first draft of Book 4, and expanding the plot for Book 5. The "how" part of the question can be answered by the fact I wanted to create a massive world for the story. The "why" would be answered by a desire to leave humankind a legacy, which is what I see as the primary thing I do with my writing. That's what every author should remember; you leave a legacy to the world when you publish books.

How was the idea for your book, Hidden developed?

I found a project on Facebook one day where the concept was for a number of authors to create a single-word title, i.e. "Hidden," and write their personal take of the story for it. Each week another was scheduled to publish their story, and the following week the next author would do this, and so on. When I chose my story I decided to tackle something so often "hidden" in society, which is depression, anxiety, and related illnesses. Personally I've battled with depression half my life, had bouts of anxiety attacks and have had to recover from PTSD (I'm not going into the personal details of what happened). So I injected a measure of autobiographical traits into a story of two friends who tackle the tough discussion they're having after months of drifting apart about why they've behaved in such a way when they're supposedly "best friends." Without spoilers, the story shows the reader they've got a reason to have this discussion. There's a follow-on book planned though I cannot give any details yet on scheduling.

Who inspired the character of Marrida in Stolen Truth?

Marrida is, in part, a mirror image of me. Like with the book Hidden, I tackle the topic of depression and PTSD in the series (Stolen Truth is Book 2 of The Wolf Riders of Keldarra, due for release on 1 December 2020 and available on pre-release ordering in Paperback and e-Book format on Amazon). Her backstory includes dealing with and learning to overcome the effects of bullying she endured while going to the Temple of Ruh'nar (at the beginning of Book 1, Tainted Truth) and as the youngest person there she stood out like a sore thumb. She has to overcome what happened because of the things that happen to her in later parts of the story (which I won't spoil here) but her story through the series is designed to be a story of growth, self-discovery, and learning to be a confident person. All of which I had to do myself once the bullying at school stopped for me. And then for good measure she's also learning to be resilient and not give up, which I'm learning now as an author...

What is the significance of the title of your book, Donta Naughty?

It's "Don Quixote" meets your worst romantic vampire setting. The explanation is revealed in the story. There's a bit of humour in the story too...

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

I began my writing later in life, but if I would tell the younger self dreaming about writing anything I'd tell her: "Don't be afraid."

What is the toughest criticism you've ever received? What was the best?

Interestingly both criticisms relate to the evolution of my book Tainted Truth. I published this book under a different title (still visible on Amazon if readers want to see the name of the book), where someone suggested it was the worst grammar, worst everything they'd written. Because I wanted to make the book better and didn't know how I had a heart to heart with Orna Ross. I pulled all my books down in late 2017 with the intention to rewrite and re-release (which according to Joanna Penn is something independent authors can do as often as they want). My plan was to be complete with the re-writing by the end of 2021, and I'm about 50% done with the re-writing now. Mind you, discovering ProWritingAid boosted my confidence in my writing skill enormously, and the accolade came when my proofreader suggested that for the size of book Tainted Truth she found few errors to correct. So the worst criticism actually became my motivation to become better at writing on all fronts. I'm a glass half full kind of person these days, so I only see the positive results when someone tells me the story could be better. I have taken a similar approach of improving each book that needs to be rewritten, and apply everything I learn to each new story I tackle.

Have you worked on some new plots during quarantine?

During the quarantine time I worked on Book 4 of The Wolf Riders of Keldarra, editing Books 2 and 3 of the same series, and yeah, even found time to come up with a few interesting plots. One is a futuristic alien first contact story and the other is a historical fantasy fiction story. In addition, I've also worked on creating a few stories due to be released in a number of anthologies in the next few years.

How has been your experience of working with AllAuthor?

Great! It has given me more followers on social media, and I can credit a few book sales from the site too from people who said they found me on the site and then went on to buy one of my books. I'll keep using the site.

Ask Nathalie M.L. Römer a Question

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    • AllAuthor AllAuthor 1 year ago
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    • Writing can be an emotionally draining and stressful pursuit. Any tips for aspiring writers?
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      • Nathalie M.L. Römer Nathalie M.L. Römer 1 year ago
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      • You've probably heard of this thing everyone calls "writer's block" which is possibly what happens when writing has become emotionally draining. Now, I'm telling you there's no such thing. Instead, become used to the "rechargeable creative battery" which is what I refer to as the "fuel" for writing. I never get this so-called "writer's block" because of this differing mindset about writing.

        When you do exercises, you can do it only for so long before you get tired. When you play a game, you can do it for so long before getting tired. When you use your brain for study, for a job, for anything else, you can do it only for so long before you feel tired and drained. It means, at this moment, your "battery" in your mind is drained. Stress in a job can cause the battery to drain faster. The more stress the faster it happens. Like with a rechargeable battery used for a cell phone or other equipment if you only allow yourself to "recharge" a little while it shortens the time available to work adequately. This is the reason you're advised to only sit at a computer for 20-30 minutes then to go do something else.

        It's the same with writing. Spreading out the workload into smaller chunks with many small breaks and regular longer breaks helps with the writing pursuits. If you read a previous answer from me I mentioned I've written at least 1.6 million words to date - over 4.5 years up to end of May 2019 - and I've only managed this because of how I give myself time to recharge my creative battery constantly. I have a schedule where I write at least 1,000 words every day (I write every day just like Stephen King), but I don't stress if no words want to come out of the creative soup called my brain. I have even days where I went all in and wrote in the excess of 15,000 (not recommended if you're not used to working in a calm, silent environment with no one to disturb you - recently discovered I have a similar quirk of waiting for my partner to leave before I get to work which is what Nora Roberts does as well). Never try to be another author. Learn from what works for them then adapt their way of doing things to your own way of doing things. Top tip: Look at what you're already good at and use that as a foundation to create a good writing practice for yourself - and then stick with it!!!

        The best two tips anyone gave me are these two:

        1. Only write for yourself and not to live up to any person's expectations. This helps form your writing into your unique voice that doesn't feel forced. Oh, and I uphold this advice fully and will even say in marketing campaigns I write wordy stories. The first book written and now re-written has over 238,000 words and it's part of a nine-part series. Oftentimes it's said not to write a series as your first story, but if you listen to such suggestions and stick to writing a 50,000 book when you FEEL you want to write a longer book or a longer book in a long series, it's proof you're letting trying to live up to another person's expectations - i.e. that you should only write a certain type of book as a new author. Just write and let your muse dictate what ends up on paper.

        2. The more you write the better you get at it. This advice comes from Orna Ross and was the catalyst for me to start rewriting my first eight books. Proof of how true this is coming from a comparison between what I wrote in 2015 and what I wrote more recently as I'm completing the first draft of Book 4 of my series. In both cases wordy. I've decided I like writing wordy books (deal with it! - see point 1 above) and my current wordy book is 3:1 ration show:tell and I'm doing a lot more worldbuilding through what characters talk about to each other (extra tip: it helps to just read out the words without the "he said/she said" tag to get a feel of how well it sounds). Remember also that the first draft is there to get the words out of your brain and onto paper, and that you can clean up the mess of spelling, grammar etc. later on.

        Yoda says it best: "Do or do not. There is no try.” (I recommend the "do" part)

        He also says: "Always pass on what you have learned.” (which is the reason for my post)
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      • Christine U. Cowin Christine U. Cowin 1 year ago
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      • Hi Nathalia,
        I really enjoyed your article on writer’s block. This is not a problem for me. I’m a prolific writer. I do agree with you, we need to recharge our batteries. I find if I write and break, I can come back and write more. You just need to let your brain rest. It to is an entity, as are all parts of your body and each part has its own way of coping. I guess I know what is important to each parts, of my body. Great article. Thank you.
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    • AllAuthor AllAuthor 1 year ago
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    • If you had the choice to rewrite any of your books, which one would it be and why?
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      • Nathalie M.L. Römer Nathalie M.L. Römer 1 year ago
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      • This is an interesting question as I AM currently rewriting my earliest books, and Tainted Truth is the first one to reach its completion in the process. If a fellow author feels the so-called "impostor syndrome" (I did too!) and feels a book isn't good enough, you need to always remember that, as an independently published author, you can and SHOULD consider rewriting a book, and then get it professionally edited and professionally proofread; consider both a developmental edit and a copy-edit for the book. Never make the mistake I made early on in my career of choosing a "random editor" on the internet, and always go with direct recommendations from fellow authors. DON'T let the self-doubt beat you ever. I leave you with the best advice I received from fellow author and friend Orna Ross:

        "The more you write the better you get at it."
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        • Nathan Parks Nathan Parks 1 year ago
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        • Agreed! I did not Rewrite my first novel, but I did go back and make some small changes and then went with a professional editor. With that I even had former readers that picked up the novel again, and then changed their medium reviews to a stronger review!
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      • Nathalie M.L. Römer Nathalie M.L. Römer 1 year ago
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      • I started my writing journey in November 2014. I started to realise that I had stories stuck in my mind that I wanted to get out there. The first short story I wrote became part of the book Tainted Truth.
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      • Christine U. Cowin Christine U. Cowin 1 year ago
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      • I’ve day dreamed all my life and never realised I had to write books until I lived in Istanbul. There at the age of fifty, I found out I had to write book and ever since, I’ve just wrote. Now I can’t stop. Many times I want to throw it all in but there’s a part of me that’s driven to write.
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