An idea that is not dangerous is unworthy of being called an idea at all. Elbert Hubbard

About Author
Robin Leemann Donovan
Robin Leemann Donovan
  • Country: United States
  • Books: 3
  • Profession: Advertising
  • Born: 5 November
  • Member Since: Oct 2018
  • Profile Views: 2,141
  • Followers: 2
  • Writing:

    Mysteries Humor
BIOGRAPHY

Started as a high school English teacher. Moved into advertising. Started a humorous blog about menopause (menologues) and it was picked up by Vibrant Nation and Alltop. Got a publisher as a client and felt it was the perfect storm. I write humorous mysteries with plot integrity - I don't use humor as an excuse to leave a million red herrings. My amateur sleuth is a menopausal woman with very normal flaws and possibly larger than average ego - after all, she is in advertising.

  • Robin Leemann Donovan

Book Views: 130

Is It Still Murder Even If She Was A Bitch? (The Donna Leigh Mysteries Book 1)

Publish Date: Nov 09, 2015

Genre: Mysteries, Humor

avg rating4.3 - 34 reviews on Amazon

All time favourite (1)

Robin Leemann Donovan's Books

Is It Still Murder Even If She Was A Bitch? (The Donna Leigh Mysteries Book 1)

by:

Publication Date: Nov 09, 2015

Mysteries, Humor

4.3 (34 ratings)

Favourite (1) Discussions (2)

I Didn't Kill Her But That May Have Been Shortsighted (The Donna Leigh Mysteries Book 2)

by:

Publication Date: Oct 23, 2015

Mysteries, Humor

4.5 (42 ratings)

Discussions (3)

I Don't Know Why They Killed Him; He Wasn't Really That Annoying (The Donna Leigh Mysteries Book 3)

by:

Publication Date: Mar 08, 2017

Mysteries, Humor

5 (3 ratings)

Favourite (2) Discussions (3)

Ask Robin Leemann Donovan a question

    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • What inspired you to start writing? How long have you been writing?
    • report
    • like
    • reply
      • rldonovan 1 month AuthorAuthor
      • I have always written. In my early years most of my writing was in the form of letters to friends and family and it was always humor. By the time I was in college, I knew I wanted to teach English, so I took writing classes. I taught for three years and moved on to advertising, where I worked more with a calculator than a pen. I always thought I would write a book when life slowed down - but it never did. My business partner pushed me into blogging and I loved it. Once I owned the ad agency, and had a modest following for my blogging all I needed was a publisher/client to create the perfect storm. And then we got a publisher for a client and the rest was history.
      • report
      • like (1)
      • reply
    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?
    • report
    • like
    • reply
      • rldonovan 1 month AuthorAuthor
      • In my first novel I talk about an incident where the murder victim and I were thrown out of a client's office. That really happened. The client was mad at us because our creative director had quit. She thought he was cute and she wanted us to release her from her contract so she could follow him to his new company. When we refused she became apoplectic and threw us out. Seven years later, when I was at a book store discussing details of my upcoming reading, someone came up to me and said hello. It was that client, greeting me as though we were long lost friends. I panicked and must have looked insane. I didn't want her to know I had written a book. I didn't think she would be happy to read about that incident. To date I have never seen her again.
      • report
      • like (1)
      • reply
    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • What, in your opinion, are the most important elements of good writing?
    • report
    • like
    • reply
      • rldonovan 1 month AuthorAuthor
      • Good writing feels genuine and natural, not forced and awkward. Although literary license is perfectly acceptable, a solid basis of good grammar is necessary for the prose to flow smoothly. I read a number of cozy mysteries, and they don't always make the effort to edit and proofread. Many cozy writers take a great deal of license with the English language, often in an attempt to be trendy. These attempts can be awkward and impede sentence flow, i.e. "That floor needs painted." Why can't they just said "that floor needs paint" or "that floor needs to be painted?" These jargony shortcuts disrupt the flow. Today everyone wants to say "y'all." Cozy authors sometimes jam it in every chance they get - because it's cool. But I find cool often comes across as lame in prose.
      • report
      • like (1)
      • reply
  • View all 7 comment

Error:

Warning: