Ask Dan Gallagher a question

Dan Gallagher

Dan Gallagher

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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • Ancient of Genes will be out in the fall of 2019, likely from Liberty Island Media which loved it for current marketing plans (these could change). LIM requested specific reworks and length changes as a condition of publishing, but is not obligated. If LIM declines, though, AOG will be self-published AT LEAST in time for the holidays 2019. Current AOG excerpts, art and reviews of its predecessor are at StoriesAmazing.com.
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    • authordan 1 month Current AuthorAuthor
    • Hmm. Read The Pleistocene Redemption (1997, rev 1998) and then read The Eden Prophecy. Then let me know YOUR thoughts via the Contact page at AuthorDan.com!
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • Writers have improved the craft itself, and this is beyond changes in language and dialect. There are changes that irritate: political correctness becomes obtrusive and feels like indoctrination (ask any HS student forced to read such tripe for the teachers' purpose of pushing an agenda rather than teaching craft and appreciation). Writing in the present tense, especially with a cynical perspective, is exceedingly irritating (ask any HS students...).
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • Yes. The fight scene in the swamp (found in AOG and in more detail in TPR) actually took place and I actually got similar discipline to that depicted. Other action scenes, such as combat, etc. also come from exceedingly realistic training exercises. I've traveled to most continents, been attacked by death-dealing animals, jumped from aircraft, and done many of the things depicted in my writing. And I'm gettin' old!
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • Everybody has some occasions of writer's block. However the near-cure is to write a strong outline and set your brainstorming down in associated notes. This creates a writing assignment that is specific. Then, when you look at the specific "assignment" you gave yourself, you get in almost academic-compliance mode and get a draft completed, segment by segment. Later editing refines all of this, but such outlines and notes are effective...do that work!
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • Have you ever experienced "Writer's Block"? Any tips you would like to share to overcome it?
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • Have you ever experienced "Writer's Block"? Any tips you would like to share to overcome it?
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • If you have a traditionalist perspective, do not allow the book to be sent broadly out to unknown reviewers. I met a Library Journal reviewer at an event and handed her a copy of my work. She asked about author purpose, and I revealed that it had a very subtle Christian perspective. She halted the conversation, walked away with the book and gave it a slam review. That was intellectually dishonest and reflective of a crusading-purging-censoring mindset, common in most areas of the media.
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • When TPR was in print, the cover did stop folks in their tracks, and the back cover description drove them to the front matter. That front matter included art, an intriguing prologue and other features that drove purchase. So: "Stifle, you know-it-all agents & editors who toss debut novels merely because they have a prologue, are over 100,000 words or start with a dream sequence!
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • What's the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex?
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • The re-write of The Pleistocene Redemption, Ancient of Genes, has moral and ethical messages that are the most important for me to convey for readers to ponder. It seems, therefore, that wide-distribution is the key: AOG needs to cross the 100,000 copies-sold mark and become a TV series.
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • My first book was TPR, which had a fascinating story line and sold 4,100 copies in two years, self-published, with scant marketing. It took a while to realize that I had to improve my prose because it actually out-sold most self-published novels. That performance was not enough to eradicate the stigma that major publishers assign to such works, and it temporarily masked the need to improve my writing craft. I have improved it tremendously, and that comes from readers and critics (see SSFP), but I continue to improve.
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • There are two, and I have experienced both:
      1. Selling copies off-book (printing ore than the author is told).
      2. Noting great plots and features, rejecting the book, then giving these notes to a favored author to use in creating a nearly plagiarized version. Both occurred with TPR when it was self-published. Hesitate to self-publish. Nonfictions have a far better chance of profit when self-published. I wish I had self-published SSFP!
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • Embrace the emotion and stress, but in the form of intensely imagining (brainstorming, then almost experiencing) the tale, outlining it (a necessity for novels and collections of interrelated shorts; helpful for short stories) and writing it. Edit many times for mechanical errors and for connections that move the plot.
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • Writing can be an emotionally draining and stressful pursuit. Any tips for aspiring writers?
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • High concept, action and plausibility. It must be very tout, and the ending not easily predictable.
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • What, in your opinion, are the most important elements of good writing?
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    • authordan 1 month AuthorAuthor
    • Starting in 1992, when I received the Certified Financial Planner designation to add to others, I wanted to edify consumers but also use writing to build my business. However, I always loved reading and writing hard-hitting adventure fiction, particularly speculative fiction related to my hobby interest in natural science. In 1996, I researched and wrote a draft of The Pleistocene Redemption (TPR), which depicted a far different technology and purpose for recreation of Ice Age animals...and humans. It was based upon the following.

      There exists only one prophecy that, in one form or another, is found in all main sects of the major religion and also in nearly all myth traditions: The resurrection of humankind; a recreation of Eden after destruction of the current world. The other other area of fact was a set of genetic discoveries: What we once thought of a "junk DNA" is mainly archived ancient attributes of ancestors, made dormant yet able to be expressed. These attributes include personality genes. But there is one more fact: It is now possible to target the gene sequences in egg and sperm in a way that changes progeny, not just one organism. These genetic discoveries gave rise to the actual prospect of changing humanity for the better, or simultaneously protecting one's own people from sabotage of the gene pool of enemy nations. Now, physical mechanisms are within reach that can implement a physical and spiritual resurrection: actual ancestors--the persons and not merely past species.

      TPR envisions what could be the terrifying sunset of humanity, or its resurrection from inception. My short story spin-offs carry on this themes, and one of my two in-progress collections will be a sequel to TPR (The stories stand alone, but progress as connected ancient and modern setting pairs that function similarly to chapters in a novel. Another in-progress collection is focused more on cryptozoological discoveries and genetic creations; each tale has at least one nonfiction accompaniment.

      I retired in January 2018 and my zero-bias, expert nonfiction The Secrets of Successful Financial Planning (SSFP) was released by Skyhorse Publishing of NY at the end of September 2018. Two other traditional small presses published several of my short stories in 2018 and 2019 anthologies that featured other award-winning authors. Liberty Island Media of NY found strong enough interest in TPR's latest version (Ancient Of Genes) to direct specific improvements and it is now considering that revision for publication in tin fall 2018. I now spend my time in mostly split between freelance writing/editing and building my fiction collections.
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    • allauthor 1 monthAllauthor
    • What inspired you to start writing? How long have you been writing?
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