About Author
Caryl McAdoo
Caryl McAdoo
  • Country: United States
  • Books: 4
  • Profession: Author in God's service
  • Born: 3 May
  • Member Since: Apr 2019
  • Profile Views: 2,400
  • Followers: 57
  • Writing:

    Contemporary Romance Historical Romance Western Romance Historical Fiction Women's Fiction Christian Fiction Teen & Young Adult Children's Christian Nonfiction
BIOGRAPHY

Blessed and highly favored bride-to-be of the King of Kings, Yeshua! Wife of fifty-plus years to my best friend Ron; Mama to four, and Grami to eighteen grandsugars! I pray my story gives God glory---always free of cursing and on-scene intimacies. I love living in Texas and singing praise and worship! I hate roller coasters!

  • Caryl McAdoo

Book Views: 778

Texas Tears (Thanksgiving Books & Blessings Collection Two Book 1)

Publish Date: Sep 02, 2019

Genre: Historical Romance, Western Romance, Religion & Spirituality

avg rating4.9 - 23 reviews on Amazon

Caryl McAdoo's Books

Texas Tears (Thanksgiving Books & Blessings Collection Two Book 1)

by:

Publication Date: Sep 02, 2019

Historical Romance, Western Romance, Religion & Spirituality

4.9 (23 ratings)

The Adventures of Sergeant Socks: The Journey Home (River Bottom Ranch Stories Book 1)

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Publication Date: Jun 18, 2019

Jewel's Gold (Gold Diggers Collection One Book 4)

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Publication Date: Jul 20, 2019

4.8 (13 ratings)

Favourite (1)

Gone to Texas: Cross Timbers Romance Family Saga, book one (Thanksgiving Books & Blessings Collection One 1)

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Publication Date: Sep 06, 2018

Historical Romance, Western Romance, Christian Fiction

4.7 (60 ratings)

Favourite (2)

Ask Caryl McAdoo a question

    • Donna 2 daysAuthor
    • Hi Caryl, I am a blind author with a young adult novel called The Heart of Applebutter Hill. I'm writing to ask if you would kindly vote for my book cover in the book cover comp? I've made it into Round 3. I am using this opportunity to raise awareness about blindness, accessibility, guide dogs and other disabilities. This novel is educator-recommended for its diversity, anti-bullying and inclusion themes. I would appreciate your help! :)
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    • allauthor 4 monthsAllauthor
    • What's the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex?
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      • carylmcadoo 4 monthsAuthor
      • Because I was a professional editor for eleven years, I KNOW what women's problem is with writing good heroes! And it's hard to fix because THEY ARE NOT MEN and do not know what it's like to BE a strong man. I'm SO BLESSED not to have this problem because I write with my husband of 50+ years now. He went to Writers Workshop and learned the craft alongside me! He has the last word on anything masculine in our story, so I have fabulous heroes!

        The one thing women must do it give the men in their stories FEWER words to say. Ron used to critique those ladies by saying, "Go through your dialogue and cut your man's in half. Then go back a second time and cut it in half again!" He tells me, "Strong men don't explain themselves and they don't pass out information. Information is power, Caryl."

        Ron is my hero! The most Christ-like man I've ever known, he's a wonderful best friend, husband, and father to our children! He's a pretty good O'Pa, too, once the little ones get up to be a three-year-old. I am so blessed to have been together with him since we were sixteen years old, married since we were eighteen.
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    • allauthor 4 monthsAllauthor
    • What, in your opinion, are the most important elements of good writing?
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      • carylmcadoo 4 monthsAuthor
      • I believe it would be "Point of View" (POV), and also think it's the hardest of an author's tools to grasp. It's all about getting into the head of one character--usually the one with the most emotion at risk in the scene being written--and telling the story from THEIR perspective ONLY. This method allows the readers to get to know my characters in a deep relationship. It's why so many of my reviews say how much they loved the characters and could identify with them, wanted them to be in their family or at least neighbors!

        Most new writers want to write in omniscient POV which is being way up above the story, seeing all, hearing all, and knowing all. This method is TELLING the story, not SHOWING it, and it's BORING. The writer is keeping the reader at arm's length and not letting them get downright INTO the story to live vicariously through the characters.

        There are many other tools an author has today to write a good story like scene and sequel, active versus passive voice, motivation before reaction, character development, dialogue, and more. But most important to me is the POV--who's telling the story?
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