Many receive advice, only the wise profit by it. Publilius Syrus

About Author
JD Stanley
JD Stanley
  • Country: Canada
  • Books: 2
  • Profession: Award winning historical fantasy author JD Stanley.com. Writrepreneur. Screenwriter. Druid. Mythology junkie.
  • Member Since: Jun 2016
  • Profile Views: 17,797
  • Followers: 1
  • Writing:

    Historical Fiction Science Fiction Fantasy Horror
BIOGRAPHY

JD Stanley is a Book Excellence Award winning historical speculative fantasy author and solitary Bardic Druid with ties to the OBOD (Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids). JD honed voice and audio editing chops in the 80s as a radio announcer and studio engineer before embracing a lifelong guy-behind-the-curtain freelance career as a commercial and content copywriter, editor, screenwriter and script doctor. Landed Entertainment director Junga Song once called JD “the greatest writer nobody’s ever heard of”.

Early in life, the fictional worlds of Mary Stewart, Colleen McCullough, Tolkien, Heinlein, Cervantes and Shakespeare bent JD’s world perception into a magical place of unlikely heroes, quests, the interconnectedness of past and future and that though bad things happen to regular folks, a dollop of wit can make it bearable. Unapologising mythology and ancient history junkie, sorcery of science lover and student of human interaction, JD’s combined passions weave rich speculative explorations into traditional concepts of good and evil where flawed heroes most often struggle to get out of their own way to do the right thing.

JD is also co-executive producer, screenwriter and webmaster for independent film promotion and production company, Bony Fiddle, and coaches written and spoken communication for business as a people manager and certified Quality Assurance Program Manager at an Internet technology company in Toronto, Canada.

  • JD Stanley

Book Views: 14491

The Seer

Publish Date: Jan 27, 2017

Genre: Historical Fiction, Fantasy

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JD Stanley's Books

The Seer

The Seer

by:

Publication Date: Jan 27, 2017

Historical Fiction, Fantasy

Blood Runner

Blood Runner

by:

Publication Date: Mar 12, 2016

Paranormal Romance, Historical Fiction, Fantasy

4 (8 ratings)

Ask JD Stanley a question

    • allauthor 1 dayAllauthor
    • Writing can be an emotionally draining and stressful pursuit. Any tips for aspiring writers?
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      • jdstanley 1 day Post AdminAuthor
      • If it's not emotionally draining while you're writing it, you're doing it wrong. That same emotion carries through your words to the reader. The words *have* to be charged with that emotion to pull the reader into the story and have them believe it. Otherwise? It's just words on a page.

        Overall, though, writing isn't for the weak. You're nearly never getting an instant pay-off. That pay-off may not even come for a decade or more, so you have to be prepared for that. If your only motivation for writing is you think you're getting famous and rich two seconds after you put something out and are okay with giving up when it doesn't happen, you're in the wrong business. It takes stamina. And it's more frustrating and heart-breaking going into it setting yourself up for that kind of disappointment. You have to do it, because you love it and you can't *not* do it. The eventual pay-off can't be your only motivation.

        A great end goal to shoot for is to make a decent living off your art, but you're not going to do it on one book. You're playing a long game, building up your reputation over time, building a fan base, building your skills, putting out quality work you're getting out in front of new readers... It takes time to make all those things come together.

        Learn to take a constructive critique without wanting to throw in the towel. If it's coming from someone who's been in the business a while, they know things you don't, so take the info in and use what's relevant to you. You don't need to use all of it, because some of it comes down to taste, but the business part? Yeah, take the advice. When you're sending to traditional publishers, be persistent. Not in the hounding a single publisher kind of way, but in continuing to send to more publishers when you get rejections. But make sure you do your research. Send to places that are looking for your type of work, so you don't waste your time or theirs. Some of the most famous writers we know were rejected hundreds of times, so keep at it. Eventually, you'll find an editor who really loves your voice and "gets" you.

        Write every day and protect your writing time. Don't let other things get in the way of it, even if you only have an hour a day between a day job and kids and responsibilities. If you're in it for the long-haul, you'll always find the time. Practice your art and never think you're "good enough" - challenge yourself to improve with every new thing you create.
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    • allauthor 1 dayAllauthor
    • How do you think your writing style has changed over the years?
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      • jdstanley 1 day Post AdminAuthor
      • I was very much a product of the 60s and 70s. The style of prose then was very wordy. If you've ever read books from the 1900s, you could see the influence from that time, even in popular fiction. That's the way I started off while I mirrored what my favourite authors did. I credit the commercial writing I've done in my life with teaching me to pare down my fiction writing. Now I look for ways to use less and better words to make it really lean and a faster read while still conveying the same story.
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    • allauthor 1 dayAllauthor
    • If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?
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      • jdstanley 1 day Post AdminAuthor
      • Writing for other people definitely pays the bills, but after awhile, it becomes wholly unfulfilling. Start writing for yourself now. That was always your goal, so make it your first priority and everything else will take care of itself around it.
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