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Marie Lavender

Marie Lavender

Thrillers Suspense Mysteries Supernatural Suspense Contemporary Romance Historical Romance Romantic Suspense New Adult Romance Paranormal Romance Romance Time Travel Romance Women's Fiction Science Fiction Fantasy Children's Poetry
    • Donna 4 daysAuthor
    • Hi Marie, I am a blind author with a YA fantasy called The Heart of Applebutter Hill. I'm writing to ask if you would kindly vote for my book cover in the book cover comp? I've made it into Round 3. I am using this opportunity to raise awareness about blindness, accessibility, guide dogs and other disabilities. This novel is educator-recommended for its diversity, anti-bullying and inclusion themes. I would appreciate your help! :)
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    • allauthor 4 monthsAllauthor
    • How do you think concepts such as Kindle, and e-books have changed the present or future of reading?
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      • marielavender1 4 monthsAuthor
      • Though e-books are more convenient for tech savvy readers, I often contemplate whether we should put such an emphasis on that kind of medium. I'd hate for people to forget how wonderful it is to hold a physical book. I like to display all the books I buy on my shelves. You don't necessarily have that luxury with an e-reader. Well, maybe in some ways.

        Yet, certain technology may not always last. What if we were forced to go dark sometime? Then how might we read our books?
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      • marielavender1 4 months CurrentAuthor
      • Busy! I go out of my way to try to work on the book in some capacity each day. Whether I'm writing a scene, chapter, or simply doing research, I make sure I'm working toward my goal of finishing the story and honoring its original vision. However, I keep my mind open for when a character surprises me.
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    • allauthor 4 monthsAllauthor
    • Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?
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      • marielavender1 4 monthsAuthor
      • Yes, I have. There's a lot of me in my work. My fiancé agrees. Also, if a big trauma happened in my life, it's bound to come out on the page somewhere. That's just the way I'm wired. Writing is cathartic.
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      • marielavender1 4 monthsAuthor
      • I could name all of them, but if I have to narrow it down, I think editing is the worst part. I've spent a long time writing the book, and I start to get antsy when the editing stage rolls around. I'd prefer it to be over as soon as it starts.

        The practical side knows it's a necessary evil, but at the same time I would rather go hide than acknowledge all the mistakes I made. Plus, once the book has been sent to beta readers, it's out of my hands. Yet, I still can't help but want to start chewing my fingernails because the waiting period is so intense.
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    • allauthor 4 monthsAllauthor
    • If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?
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      • marielavender1 4 monthsAuthor
      • OMG...try to have more patience! With yourself, with others of course, but also just because every writer's journey isn't easy, and being frustrated with the lag times doesn't help anyone in long run.
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • Besides releasing as many books as possible? LOL. I would like to do more traveling. I've always wanted to travel all over the world.

        Ireland is one of my dream goals. My great grandfather was Irish, and I'd like to explore my roots a bit. I love the music there, and the mythology. Plus, the country just looks stunning. I can't wait to visit it! :)
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • With the emphasis on short posts via social media and urban slang - abbreviating everything - I fear for the future of the current generation. If we don't teach them well, especially leave them with great reading skills, then yes, the publishing industry will suffer. But that's beside the point, really. The problem is that literacy is so essential to being a functional member of society. If we can't read, we can't question what's happening around us. And we won't know how to avoid making history's mistakes again. Without reading, I would be nowhere. I use the skill to research everything for a story, but also any time I have a question about current events. What's more is that all the books I've read in my life have taught me so much.

        You don't need to attend college to do this, but you can be self-taught. My advice for the current generation is...Read every book you can get your hands on. Some people aren't into the fictional world. That's fine. Just don't stop reading. When you're online, consider the source. Is it legitimate? Does this person know what they're talking about, or is it just one more individual creating a YouTube tutorial to make money? Yet, reading a book? That's different. Literature helps us evaluate the world around us. We will pick up better skills, learn about history, and how things work.

        How can we understand everything better without being able to read books?
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • I'd like to think it has evolved considerably. I'm more comfortable in my own skin when writing. I can approach new territories - try out new genres or sensitive topics - without feeling insecure. I know upfront that not everybody will love the book, but if I am not honoring my characters and the book's vision, what is the point of writing?
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • Having a good cover and a title that resonates with a reader - something that reflects the book's contents - is essential. But, coming up with a decent title is always a challenge. Most of us have no legal right to a word or phrase - ahem, 'cocky' - yet we must create a title that hasn't been overused as well.

        Beyond that, finding the best cover artist - even if the cover is a premade which is still outstanding - is a must for any hope of marketing a book. They say to never judge a book by its cover. But I think a lot of readers do just that, and with good reason. If we as authors or publishers don't invest in a book's external appearance, how can a reader trust the quality of the work within?
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • This isn't a personal accusation, by any means, but I think social media has become so cruel in some ways. It is a distraction we as writers can't afford, yet we are unable to walk away for various reasons - sometimes because our publishing contracts force us to have a web presence. Believe me, I love meeting new people, and I enjoy book launches. But with all the violence in the world, the internet trolls, and drama about various issues , it is discouraging for writers who simply want to delve into their creative worlds. This can be a deterrent, and it takes significant focus to overlook the chaos now and then in order to write a book. So if it was possible to change something, I wish I could go back to the the time I didn't know about Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, and just enjoy the wonder of writing.

        Or, I could get a good publicist, I guess. In any case, I think I would be able to write more books! LOL.
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • I think dipping my toes in the indie publishing industry in 2010 gave me a glimpse into the world I needed to learn about. There are so many aspects an indie author must cover - often steps that traditional publishers do every day - that we don't consider. I've learned to take each project in careful steps - writing, outlining, more writing, then a break before I tackle the difficult editing process, final revisions, as well as all the marketing aspects involved in publishing. I have also worked with a publisher for many of my books. I have the fortune of understanding both sides to the writing career.
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • The worst practice I can think of at the moment is paying lots of money for book reviews. I have never paid for a review in my entire career. I have left it up to readers to add their reviews, and I've reached out to potential book reviewers to consider my work. But I would never strong-arm or bribe anyone to do so.
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      • marielavender1 5 monthsAuthor
      • I can't pin down the exact thing that inspired me to write. The urge was always there, hounding me, even as a child. Once I could write a legible sentence, I began composing all the stories in my head in that fashion. It was, oddly enough, a cathartic release. It freed me up to write even more, to explore the fictional world. So technically, I have been writing different types of stories since I was nine years old.
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